Tuesday Photo Challenge: Pin-tailed Whydah.New Bird in My Garden

Frank’s Dutch Goes the Photo – New Bird in my Garden

I had a new visitor on June 17, 2018. It was a beautiful bird I hadn’t seen before. I was fascinated by its graceful long tail which is twice as long as its body. The sharp contrast of black and white feather with an orange beak wouldn’t escape anyone’s sight.

It happened I had the patio door open to take photos of the birds feeding. It flew into my garden. I grabbed the camera and tried to be in a hidden position so I wouldn’t scare the birds away. I only had 30 seconds before it flew away.

On the same day, De Wets Wild had a post about the same bird. I almost jumped out of my seat because the information of the bird came so timely. De Wets Wild told me that its tail is beautiful in the air. It was not within my sight when it flew away.

Following my photos, I copied a photo and the information from De Wets Wild’s post. Please visit his wonderful posts about the animals in the wild.

Whyhad bird 1

Whyhad bird 4

The post and one photo from De Wets Wild:

The little Pin-tailed Whydah (12cm long, without the tail, and weighing only about 15g) is most known for the aggressive nature of the breeding males, which carries tails almost double their own body length and have no qualms tackling birds many times their own weight, like doves and pigeons, over a food source or territory!

Pin-tailed Whydahs are brood parasites, meaning that the female lays her eggs (usually 1 or 2 but up to 4 at a time) in the nests of other birds, mostly small seed-eaters like waxbills, for them to raise the chicks, often after removing some or all of the host birds’ eggs. A single Pin-tailed Whydah female may lay up to 25 eggs in a season. Their breeding season stretches from spring to autumn. Males are polygamous and highly territorial. The chicks hatch after about 11 days of incubation and leave the nest at about 3 weeks old, staying with their host family for about another week before joining a Whydah group.

Their habitat ranges from savanna, grassland, reedbeds, and scrublands to suburban parks, orchards and gardens. They feed mostly on seeds and termites. In South Africa, they occur in all our provinces, though they’re rather sparsely distributed in the arid Northern Cape, while outside of our borders Pin-tailed Whydahs occur over most of the continent south of the SaharaThe IUCN considers the Pin-tailed Whydah to be of least concern.

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Tuesday/Weekly Photo Challenge – Baby Birds in the Summer

Frank’s Tuesday Photo Challenge the prompt for this week is: Future

Weekly Photo Challenge is: Smile

I hope to see some baby birds successively hatched in the near future – summer 2018. Watching and feeding these birds put a smile on my face.

I have been feeding many kinds of birds. The Mourning Doves came back to my garden for the third year. The first year, the female dove laid eggs, but the eggs were stolen. 1) Last year, the female doves laid two eggs and both the male and female took turns to incubate the eggs. The eggs were successfully hatched to two healthy baby doves. I’m hoping the mourning doves will have chicks again this year.

I also have many House Finch in my garden. They had the same misfortune two years ago and lost their four eggs. 2) Last year, the female Finch laid three eggs and hatched four eggs. One must be twins. 3) The birds watched their chicks from the nearby tree. There are many pairs of House Finch in my garden. One pair checked out the old nest. I hope they would use the same nest to lay eggs again.

I feed them bird seeds every day to get them to be healthy and ready to be parents.

Mourning dove

Nultiple birds

House Finch 2

I bought a new Hummingbird Feeder. The Red Throat Hummingbirds seem to like the feeder. There are not too many blooms around yet. So, the Hummingbirds come every twenty minutes for feeding. They seem to be a pair, I don’t know where they would build a nest.

Red Throat Hummingbird

Red Throat Hummingbird 2

I just identified the White Crowned Sparrows in my garden. They may have been coming for years, but I didn’t pay attention to their features and I just googled and identify them as White Crowned Sparrow.

White Crowned Sparrow 2

White Crowned Sparrow

I may not see the Hummingbird babies, but I do hope to see the Mourning Dove’s chicks and the House Finch’s chicks. That is my hope for the near future – summer. In the meantime, I’ll feed them well.

Frank’s Dutch Goes the Photo: Tuesday Photo Challenge – Baby Birds in the Summer

Weekly Photo Challenge: Smile

Tuesday Photo Challenge – Exotic Birds

There are two unusual visitors at Laguna Lake by our home. The first time I saw them was in January, then in June and one other time in 2017. They looked like exotic birds. Eventually, I found out that they are Egyptian Geese. The Egyptian goose is a member of Anatidae, the biological family of birds that includes the duck, goose, and swan. It is native to Africa, south of the Sahara and the Nile Valley. Egyptian geese were considered sacred by the Ancient Egyptians and appeared in much of their artwork. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egyptian_goose

They are not regular residents of Laguna Lake. I have seen them only three times. Do they have a regular home? It is a mystery about these exotic Egyptian geese!

Geese 4

Geese 2Geese 3

Frank’s Durch Foes the Photo: Tuesday Photo Challenge – Exotic Birds

Tuesday Photo Challenge – Bird

My dear friends,

Just want to let you know that I dropped my laptop and messed up the wires, the screen is cracked, and the snaps are off. The pointer goes wild and is uncontrollable. Right now my laptop is flipped open, but I can’t close it without cracking it further. I’m in Portland, Oregon and will be going back to southern California on Saturday, October 21. I’ll wait to have it fixed or get a new laptop. I don’t know how to carry my laptop on the plane. If I’m lack of communication with you, please blame my computer!!!

I’m not able to search my archives for bird photos. It is with great effort that I use steady hands to find one seagulls photo from our trip to Key West. There are other bird photos, but won’t be able to post them.

bird1

Frank’s Tuesday Photo Challenge – Bird

No Sharing Territory

Territory bird 1

The birds love to come to the feeding in my backyard. The faithful pair of Mourning Dove comes daily for morning and evening feeding. The beautiful American Robins are also frequent visitors. All of them are usually good in sharing. Once in in while, there is a third Mourning Dove wants to come for a share. The male Mourning Dove somehow always chases him away. I wonder if he is protecting the territory of the feeding or the territory of his partner!

Territory bird 2

Territory bird 3

Territory bird 4

Daily Prompt: Territory